CMG Georgetown Public Library
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CMG  Georgetown Public Library

CMG Event - Peabody Room - The Georgetown Branch Library, DC Public Library is located in the Book Hill Neighborhood of Georgetown, 3260 R Street, NW (Intersection of R Street and Wisconsin Avenue). Wednesday, February 13, 11:30 - 1:00 pm

2/13/2019
When: 2/13/2019
11:30 am
Where: Georgetown Neighborhood Library
3260 R Street, NW
Peabody Room
Washington, District of Columbia  20007
United States
Contact: Shannon Mikush
7038550724


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If you remember the scene in the National Treasure movie, where they discover the vast quantities of gold beneath Trinity Church in Lower Manhattan, as history lovers CMGs will get an exhilarating feelin
g as they enter the Peabody Room and see the treasure trove of historical Georgetown artifacts. The room contains a portrait of Yarrow Mamout, a former slave who lived in Georgetown for many years. The original painting which you’ve seen in the National Portrait Gallery is scheduled to be returned to the Peabody Room in May.

The Georgetown Library may be the most beautiful of the DC public libraries.  There is definitely an “Ooooh! factor when you enter the building. It was designed by Nathan C. Wyeth, not to be confused with artist NC Wyeth. Architect Nathan C. designed the Key Bridge, the Embassy of Uzbekistan, the monument mast of the Battleship Maine in ANC, and The Oval Office, among his many designs in DC

We will participate in a discussion lead by Special Collections Librarian Jerry McCoy of the Georgetown Public Library.

The Peabody Room houses historical and current materials related to the history, culture and economy of Georgetown. Found here are house histories (for most individual Georgetown addresses), subject vertical files, photographs, maps, neighborhood microfilmed newspapers, paintings, engravings and artifacts that document various aspects of Georgetown life. The room is named after 19th-century financier and philanthropist George Peabody (1795-1869